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  • 100% Positive Feedback
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Places to Sell Crafts Online

Taking your first steps in the online craft marketplace can be daunting. We’ve put together some hints and tips to help with the start of the process - identifying the best places to sell crafts online.

places to sell crafts online

Selling your crafts online is a great way to turn what might have started out as a hobby into a viable business. Whilst you might be doing really well selling crafts at events, you shouldn’t miss out on the opportunity offered by selling crafts online. Whatever you’re selling, from custom-made badges to homemade cushion covers, there’s plenty of success stories out there from people who’ve dedicated their time to selling their homemade crafts online.

Most platforms are really easy to get started on, and they’re a great way for you to get exposure for your products. But there’s quite a few sites to choose from when it comes to the selling stage, and it can be hard to identify the best places to sell crafts online. We’ve made it a bit easier for you!

Etsy

This one shouldn’t surprise you – it’s the biggest and best-known online marketplace for selling crafts.

It’s a US-based site that started in 2005, and since then has built up a massive audience of shoppers which now is at around 30 million. There’s well-established traffic to the site and the opportunity to get your products seen by a lot of people, but the scale of it can of course be a disadvantage too; with so many products there it can make it harder for your items to stand out from the crowd.

Etsy shops are really easy to set up and there’s good support for sellers from the Etsy team. When it comes to fees, you’ll pay 20 cents (around 15p) to list an item for four months, or until it’s sold. Then, you’ll pay 3.5% of the sale price when it sells.etsy logo

Folksy

Folksy is often called the UK equivalent of Etsy. It’s a less well-known site with around 6000 sellers and around 250,000 visits a month. Like Etsy, it’s super-easy to set up a shop, and there’s no joining fee. Instead, you’ll pay 15p to list an item for four months and then 6% of the sale price. If your shop takes off, signing up to Folksy Plus will be a good idea as this means you won’t need to pay the 15p listing fee (although you do still pay the 6% sales commission).

Not on the High Street

Selling on Not on the High Street can be a bit trickier than other sites; it’s harder to join as they’re selective about the items that are sold on the site – they want everything to be top-quality. If you think you’ve got what it takes, apply on their site and wait to hear back from one of their team.

If you’re accepted, there are set-up fees of £199, and at 25% on every sale, the commission prices are higher than some competitor sites.

Craftsy

If you’re into sewing, it’s worth checking out Craftsy. Whilst you can’t sell your products directly, you can sell any patterns you’ve designed, and best of all, it’s free to sell them!

 

 

 

 

Dawanda

Dawanda is a German platform which started in 2006, with millions of craft products available from across the world.

It’s got a helpful and supportive community which is active in its forums, but their listing and sales fees can vary depending on the cost of the item you’re selling, so it’s worth reading up on the specifics a bit more.

Amazon Handmade

You may not have known that Amazon has a relatively recent platform on which you can buy and sell handmade crafts.

Amazon Handmade was set up in 2015 and seems designed to compete with Etsy. Until 31st December 2018, the monthly selling fee of £25 is being waived, but there is a referral fee of 12% on any sales you make.

It looks like it could be a good addition to the other sites listed here, but some people think it won’t work out. For example, Amazon’s all about getting cheap products to you quickly, which isn’t necessarily the ethos handmade crafters – and buyers – necessarily want.

Set Up Your Own Site

If none of these places to sell crafts online are ticking the right boxes for you, there’s always the option of setting up your own site.

Although this option might not be too feasible if you’re just starting up, for more well-established businesses that are selling a high amount of crafts, this is probably your best bet. It’s a more serious venture and so it obviously takes a lot more initial time and expenditure, but you’ll make savings in the long run as you won’t be paying any fees to list items, or commission fees.

Hopefully this has given you some idea of the best places to sell crafts online – let us know how you get on!

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